May 15
2006

WHIO Reports on Dayton Police Memorial Service

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Local affiliate WHIO-TV anchor Jim Baldridge begins a segment by Caryn Golden about the 18th annual Dayton Police Memorial. Officer Brame was remembered during the ceremony.

Nov 1
2005

WDTN “Still No Answers” on 6-Year Murder Anniversary

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Local Dayton affiliate WDTN-TV anchor Mark Allan and co-anchor Coleen Sullivan introduce a segment by reporter Rodney Duncan. Duncan interviews Kevin’s parents, who are still grieving and searching for answers and justice for their murdered son.

Republished with permission WDTN-TV Dayton

Oct 31
2005

Vigil Renews Call to Find Killer

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Brame kin mark anniversary of officer’s death

Ben Sutherly, Dayton Daily News
Oct. 31, 2005

DAYTON — Frustrated family members and friends of Kevin Brame called for justice during a candlelight vigil and rally Sunday, the eve of the sixth anniversary of the Dayton police officer’s death. “It is an abomination, it is an outrage that six years later no one has been charged,” said the Rev. Monika Intsiful, an associate minister at Omega Baptist Church whose daughter and Brame were friends.

Her words triggered applause and cries of agreement among the crowd of about 75 who attended the vigil at Zion Baptist Church.

 Candlelight “When our children were small, they’d often say, ‘That’s not fair,’ ” recalled Rosemary Brame, who with her husband, Gerald, thanked the crowd for their support and prayers. “It certainly wasn’t fair to Kevin.”

Brame, 31, was ambushed Nov. 1, 1999, outside 624 Cherry Drive, the home of his estranged wife.

Blasted once in the neck with a shotgun, the off-duty officer died in the driveway after dropping off his children.

“Citizens, police and prosecutors, if any one of those falls down, you’re in the position we’re in today,” Mrs. Brame said following the vigil. She’s convinced someone has information about her son’s death.

“No justice, no peace” was a common refrain during the vigil, which featured performances by the choir at Colonel White High School, Brame’s alma mater.

Mayor Rhine McLin acknowledged the “devastating impact” Brame’s death has had on those who loved him, adding, “Our police department will be doing their best to bring closure.”

Assistant Chief of Police Wanda Smith read a statement on behalf of Director of Police Julian K. Davis, who was in Washington, D.C., on Sunday, saying Brame’s family was “in the thoughts and prayers of the Dayton Police Department.”

At the end of the service, 17 people lit candles. Each spoke the name of a loved one who had been a victim of violence.

Contact Ben Sutherly at 335-0509.

Copyright, 2005, Cox Ohio Publishing. All rights reserved. Reprinted with Permission.

Nov 10
2004

CDTN Covers 5-Year Murder Anniversary at Commission Meeting

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CDTN (City of Dayton Television Network) – Business owner Jerry Rieman decries the lack of an arrest 2 years after his first appearance before the commission. Police Chief Julian Davis responds, saying when he came in 2002 he was surprised the Brame murder case wasn’t solved, that when someone kills a police officer, they’re killing a symbol of America.

Republished with permission CDTN Dayton.

Nov 1
2004

WHIO Coverage of 5th Anniversary of Officer Brame’s Murder

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Local Dayton affiliate WHIO-TV anchor woman Donna Jordan and reporter Rebecca Combs report on the fifth anniversary of Officer Kevin Brame’s murder.

Republished with permission from WHIO-TV Dayton.

Nov 1
2004

WDTN Coverage of 5th Anniversary of Officer Brame’s Murder

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Local Dayton affiliate WDTN-TV anchor Mark Allan and co-anchor Coleen Sullivan introduce a segment by reporter Kristi Piehl on the status and progress of the investigation into the murder of Officer Kevin Brame five years ago.

Republished with permission from WDTN-TV Dayton.

Jun 16
2003

‘We Deserve Answers’

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Two detectives go full-time to solve 3 1/2-year-old slaying of Dayton police officer

Lou Grieco, Dayton Daily News
Jun. 16, 2003

DAYTON – Rosemary Brame prayed during the seven-minute drive from her home on Athens Avenue to 624 Cherry Drive, where her son Kevin had moved out weeks earlier, and where his estranged wife, Carla, still lived.

Minutes earlier, she had gotten the call: Her son, a Dayton police officer, had been ambushed outside his wife’s home. “When we got there, the yellow tape was up,” Rosemary Brame said. “The most horrible night of my life.”

Kevin was pronounced dead in the driveway, shot once from behind moments after he dropped off his children. In the 3 1/2 years since the Nov. 1, 1999, shooting, his parents have traveled from shock to grief to frustration, as Kevin unsolved homicide went cold.

The case is no longer on ice.

“We deserve answers,” Rosemary Brame said. “Kevin put his life on the line for the city for six years.”Two Dayton detectives have been placed on special assignment to investigate the case. They are in a special office at the city’s One-Stop building. Their assignment has no time limit. Their bosses hope they’ll be on it until they solve it.

The department also has sent a packet to America’s Most Wanted, trying to get Brame’s case on the air. The reward fund has been raised to $100,000, though police are still collecting money for it and the actual amount is closer to $25,000.

“We want to reactivate and breathe new life in the case,” said Lt. John Huber, commander of the city’s Central Investigations Bureau. “I think the community expects us to do this. I think this has probably been overdue.”

The Brame family agrees.

“We deserve answers,” Rosemary Brame said. “Kevin put his life on the line for the city for six years.”

‘Things . . . got cold’

In the last hours of his life, Kevin Brame, 31, took his two sons, ages 5 and 8, to Rooster’s on North Main Street for wings, then stopped by his mother’s house. His parents, long divorced, have remained close friends. That Monday night, his father was in town. Gerald, who lives in Columbus, was celebrating his 59th birthday.

“It was an opportunity and a blessing from God that I did get to see him,” Gerald Brame said.

Kevin had recently rented a home on Rockwood Avenue, about 2 miles south of his estranged wife’s home. He and his mother spent the previous Saturday furnishing it.

“He was full of hopes and plans,” Rosemary said. “He was just on top of the world when he left our house.”

Brame dropped his sons off with his wife, Carla, then left. Three people, including Carla, heard a single gunshot, tapes of two 911 calls disclose.

A neighbor found Kevin Brame face-down in the driveway. He had been shot once in the neck.

Two weeks later, his family attended a police department awards ceremony, where Kevin’s sister accepted his last award, a departmental citation for helping curb criminal activity near Otterbein Avenue and Kings Mill Court.

Two months after the slaying, an attorney for Carla Brame filed lawsuits against then-police Chief Ronald Lowe and the Dayton postmaster, claiming they withheld autopsy reports and thus interfered with her attempts to obtain life insurance settlements in her husband’s death. She also sued three insurance companies that had declined to pay her insurance proceeds.

Carla Brame’s attorney, James R. Greene III, said Friday police should do everything they can to solve the case, and should have made it a higher priority earlier. He said he is concerned about whether the case is solvable, and said witnesses are dying and moving away.

Carla Brame has settled with the insurers and moved to Arlington, Texas.

As months passed, the case was growing cold. Homicide detectives continued to work the case, but were also getting new assignments. Police have conducted many interviews, and collected much evidence, but have never identified a suspect, Huber said.

Typically, the first few days of a homicide investigation are critical, he said.

“You’re being steered and the information is coming in at a pretty good pace,” Huber said. That process stopped quickly in the Brame case.

“Things just kind of got cold,” he said.

Working a cold case

For Gerald and Rosemary Brame, frustration mounted as years passed without an arrest. By October 2002 they were complaining at a City Commission meeting, arguing that their son’s case was being forgotten.

Police Chief William P. McManus met briefly with them after a commission meeting, to assure them that the investigation was still a priority.

“It’s important to the family that we bring closure to the case,” McManus said in May. “A person so bold to kill a police officer, it’s important that we bring him to justice.”

Gerald Brame, who has spent his career in law enforcement, including a nine-year stint with the Dayton police department, said he does not blame the homicide/assault squad, which he called overworked.

“They still have homicides going on, and they have to investigate those, too,” he said.

The Brames are pleased with the recent re-assignments of Detectives Dan Hall and Donna Pack, who are working Kevin’s case full-time. Rosemary Brame said she has confidence in both detectives.

Hall, who has had a peripheral involvement since the investigation’s start, has specialized in long-term cases, including fraud, and is good with records and technological issues, Huber said.

“He’s very meticulous and precise in doing things,” Huber said.

“People tend to assume, and in this case, officers may have assumed we knew, and we may not have,” Huber said. “We’re not only asking the public, we’re asking our own employees. Even if people don’t think it’s relevant, it might be.”Pack, who last worked with the fugitive squad, has not been involved in the Brame investigation and will bring fresh eyes to the case, Huber said.

Pack also has “the contacts. She still has a very active network of informants” on the street, Huber said.

Pack and Hall together have more than 50 years of police experience.

Huber said the detectives will learn from the experience, and this could be the beginning of a cold-case squad for the area.

There are some advantages to working a cold case, Huber said. Loyalties change, and new animosities arise. Drug addictions come under control. Consciences eat at people.

The detectives are starting from scratch, and they may re-interview people. “We’re looking for mistakes,” Huber said. “We may have made some.”

They are also sending word to their own people: Tell us what you know about Kevin. Huber said he is concerned that Kevin’s friends on the force could have information they did not realize was relevant, either about professional contacts on the street or conflicts in his personal life.

“People tend to assume, and in this case, officers may have assumed we knew, and we may not have,” Huber said. “We’re not only asking the public, we’re asking our own employees. Even if people don’t think it’s relevant, it might be.”

Anyone with information about Kevin’s death is asked to call Hall at 333-1192 or Pack at 333-1191. People can also e-mail information, however significant, contact the detectives. The family would like to see an arrest before Nov. 1, the fourth anniversary of Kevin’s death.

Rosemary Brame said the family asks that anyone with information, however significant, contact the detectives. The family would like to see an arrest before Nov. 1, the fourth anniversary of Kevin’s death.

“These are not people who deserve in any way to be protected,” Rosemary said. “This was not a crime of passion. This was an assassination. It was planned.”

Contact Lou Grieco at 225-2057 or lgrieco@DaytonDailyNews.com

Copyright, 2003, Cox Ohio Publishing. All rights reserved. Reprinted with Permission.

Jun 16
2003

WDTN Introduces Member of a New Cold Case Squad

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Local affiliate WDTN-TV anchor Mark Allen presents “Cracking the Case”, a segment by reporter Jaciel Cordoba announcing the establishment of a Cold Case Squad. Lt. John Huber states “We probably needed to do this some time ago… I don’t think we did them [the Brame family] a good service and we’re trying to rectify that.”

Dec 11
2002

WDTN Coverage of “Raising the Reward” to $100,000

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Local Dayton affiliate WDTN-TV anchor Mark Allan and newsman Jaciel Cordoba cover a press conference called by Chief William McManus to announce a drive to increase the reward fund from $25,000 to $100,000 for the conviction of the Officer Brame’s killer.

Republished with permission from WDTN-TV Dayton.

Nov 1
2002

WDTN’s Mark Allan Special Report “Call for Justice”

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Local Dayton affiliate WDTN-TV anchor Mark Allan presents a Special Report, “Call for Justice”, on the 3rd anniversary of Officer Brame’s murder. The special includes interviews with Sgt. Gary White, DPD homicide detective, and Kevin’s parents. Detective Julie Swisher, who was one of the first officers on the scene the night of Kevin’s murder recalls “the worst night of my career.”

About Justice For Kevin

ON NOVEMBER 1, 1999, Dayton police officer Kevin Brame was shot and killed by a coward approaching from behind in the front yard of his estranged wife's home. Officer Brame was off-duty -- but armed with his service pistol -- and returning his kids from a birthday celebration for their grandfather. After 11 years, the killer is still at large and walking the streets waiting to harm others. When those risking their lives every day to protect us are victims of murder, no one in our community is safe.

JusticeForKevinBrame.com is organized by the family and friends of Kevin, in cooperation with the Dayton Police Department and other law enforcement agencies to collate facts of the case, news articles, and information about Kevin's life to help bring justice to the killer(s). No killing is without witnesses. People talk. With your help and support, we WILL solve this Cold Case.

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